Saturday, November 5, 2016

I wouldn't vote for me either... The Big Sort

An important point to President Obama's interview with  Bill Maher, especially as it relates to my blog, was when the President said, "If all I watched was Fox News, I probably wouldn't vote fore me either"...

We're becoming so divided, I have previously and do now blame demagogues like Rush Limbaugh and Bill O'Reilly for this... but, nevertheless, it's all part of what Bill Bishop called "the big sort"... and I think it's clear.. it will get worse and nobody knows where it will lead.


You are voting for Trump? Why?

Reasonable people cannot disagree on this election.  Trump is a dangerous con artist who has exposed a disturbing percentage of the population that would willfully trade their freedom, democracy, and risk permanent damage to our country for a demagogue's promises.  

Perhaps you're voting for Trump because you're an evangelical...
 Donald Trump Exposes "hypocritical" evangelicals 

Or you're worried about your money in your retirement accounts...
Financial markets rattled at prospect of Trump victory

A Trump Win Would Tank the Markets 

Global Markets Shudder on Prospect of Trump presidency 

Or just angry about all the damage that Obama has done...

       He took your guns, the stock market tanked, gas prices skyrocketed? ... hmmm.

Because you're a 'business guy' and we need a 'business guy' running things:
       From business guru Tom Peters on twitter:
"Trump stands for hatred, small-mindedness, revenge, exclusion. (I am borderline embarrassed to be an old white male.)"

See also Trump Steaks, Trump Water, Trump University and his tax returns (he isn't rich, he's a showman, a con artist).

Because he'll bring your jobs back?... No, we're in a fundamental transformation of our economy, largely due to automation/technology/globalization...

"Given the volatility of the changes, the idea of an “average” worker was becoming obsolete. And while much of the discussion about economic inequality has centered on the top 1 percent, it’s the gap between the top 20 percent and the rest that’s more salient to young people. “That is a dividing point,” says Mark Rank, a professor at Washington University in St. Louis. People in the top 20 percent of income — roughly $100,000 in 2013 — have taken nearly all the economic gains of the past 40 years. (Of course, the top 1 percent and, even more so, the top 0.01 percent, has taken a far more disproportionate share).

This uncomfortable fact, which many economists have recently accepted, suggests that we are living not simply in an unequal society but rather in two separate, side-by-side economies. For those who can crack the top 20 percent, there is great promise. Most people in that elite group, Rank told me, will spend at least part of their careers among the truly affluent, earning more than $250,000 a year. For those at work in the much larger pool, there will be falling or stagnant wages and far greater uncertainty. "
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/06/22/magazine/its-official-the-boomerang-kids-wont-leave.html?smprod=nytcore-ipad&smid=nytcore-ipad-share&_r=0

 http://fivethirtyeight.com/features/dont-blame-a-skills-gap-for-lack-of-hiring-in-manufacturing/
“Weaver and Osterman offer a more industry-specific explanation: The manufacturing industry has become so specialized that companies are looking for hyperspecific skills that few outside workers could be expected to have. But companies have also become less likely to offer training for new hires. Companies, the authors write, “are unwilling or unable to solve their skill challenges through internal training, even for skills that are highly specific to a particular plant.”
Even if companies invested in more training, though, it’s unlikely they would go on a hiring spree. Ultimately, the slow pace of job growth in manufacturing isn’t companies’ fault any more than it is workers’. The cause is more fundamental than that: Due mostly to automation, U.S. factories now produce more than ever with fewer workers. That’s a trend no job-training program will reverse.”

Sadly, most are supporting Trump because they are scared.  As the NYT's piece above points out all the gains are going to the top .01% and the rest of us struggle to make sense of an economy that doesn't look like the one's we were taught about by our parents or our schools.  We must have serious, big, conversations about what success looks like and what a meaningful life is, in this new transformed economy and world.  I hope that after the election we'll be able to have those conversations, but my guess is this has all been a con from Trump to start his own TV network and try to pay off his billions in debt to the Russians.  And he'll take 30% of the population, along with Limbaugh, Hannity, Coulter, and others.  And they'll continue to divide this country, caring only for their fame and wallets not the future of the country.